Read An Excerpt From My Book, The President’s Mortician

From chapter 12: Ed Weirshellen a man wrongly convicted of murdering his wife, is on the run with his journalist acquaintance Abbie Monroe.  They are discussing the plot to kill Kennedy:

“…How can they kill a president and get away with it?”

“They got away with it because they were the most powerful people in the country.  Who was going to walk into the White House and arrest Lyndon Johnson for his part in the plot?   The FBI?  Certainly not Hoover.  The others were rogue intelligence agents and rich oilmen.  The CIA answers to no one, not even Congress.  And Texas oil can corrupt anything.  Try prosecuting that pack of jackals.” 

Ed sighed and grunted.  “This sounds like a huge operation.  How was it all held together?  How could people be counted on to shut up and do their parts?  Why didn’t someone speak out?  How could someone take a secret like that to the grave?”

Abbie replied, “Some did speak out, and they were disposed of or silenced in some way. Two things you gotta keep in mind:  One, it was done on a need-to-know basis…meaning that the players who did their small or large part in the conspiracy did not know, or were never told, what the overall plan looked like…they were just soldiers carrying out orders without knowing why; two, they were all members of secret organizations…they all knew the penalties for betraying a confidence—expulsion from the secret society which would mean a loss of their livelihood.  These societies exist, thrive and have power because its members can keep a secret.  Doesn’t matter how terrible the secret is.  Doesn’t matter what crime has been committed.  The secret society can get away with anything if secrecy is its core mandate.  The CIA, Skull and Bones, Freemasons, the Mafia, the National Security Council, the Dallas Petroleum Club, the Dallas Council on World Affairs, the Bilderbergers…they all demand this of their members.  This does not mean that these organizations as a whole plotted Kennedy’s death, but it does mean that certain of its members who were involved could be counted on to keep quiet about their roles in it.”

“You think the Secret Service was involved too, don’t you?”

 “Just a few key agents—Roy Kellerman, the agent in charge in Dallas that day; Emory Roberts, who told other agents to stand down; William Greer, the limo driver.  Elmer Moore, who pressured the Dallas doctors into changing their testimony.”

“Why would the people most responsible for protecting the president want him dead?”

“Because they despised Kennedy.  The Secret Service was not the professional, dedicated, selfless outfit we’ve been led to believe.  They were poorly paid, uneducated civil servants with guns.  And they hated Kennedy’s politics.  They hated his foreign policy; they thought he was a communist appeaser.  They hated his commitment to civil rights.  Many times they were overheard calling him a ‘nigger lover.’”

“Overheard by whom?”

“One of their own, Abraham Bolden, the first black Secret Service agent.  Kennedy personally appointed him to the White House detail in 1961.  Bolden has first-hand knowledge of the Secret Service’s lack of love for JFK in 1963.  In fact, he overheard the older agents like Kellerman, Greer and Roberts swear they would never take a bullet for Kennedy.  They often left him unguarded at hotel rooms when traveling, and they deliberately dropped standard security measures in Dallas.  Hell, they were hungover from drinking and staying out till 4 a.m. the night before.  They were recruited into the plot by CIA field operatives, probably David Atlee Phillips or Ed Lansdale.” 

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